About Code Club

Code Club is a nationwide network of free volunteer-led after school coding clubs for children aged 9-11.

We create projects for our volunteers to teach at after school coding clubs or at non-school venues such as libraries. The projects we make teach children how to program by showing them how to make computer games, animations and websites. Our volunteers go to their local club for an hour a week and teach one project a week.

Each term the students will progress and learn more whilst at the same time using their imaginations and making creative projects. Terms 1 & 2 use Scratch to teach the basics of programming. Term 3 teaches the basics of web development using HTML and CSS. Term 4 teaches Python and so on.

We have also created online training for our volunteers, to make sure they have all the info and know-how they need to run a successful Code Club.

We’d like to put a Code Club in every single primary school in the country. There are over 21,000 primary schools in the UK, it’s a big task but we think we can do it!

In November 2015 Code Club became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Raspberry Pi Foundation with the combined aim of creating a Code Club in every community in the world.


Our philosophy

Our goal is to inspire children to build and share their ideas, learning along the way.

We want children to leave Code Club inspired to pursue other digital making activities, whether that’s in their spare time, in school or as a career.

We want them to gain skills that are useful to them - not only learning to program, but also learning about computational thinking, problem solving, planning, designing and collaboration.

To find out more about our values - please read this blog post.

Why should children learn to code?

Learning to code is an important skill now we’re living in a digital age. It’s not just enough for children to know how to use technology. They should know how it works and how to build it too.

Learning to code doesn’t just mean you can become a developer - it strengthens problem solving and logical thinking skills, and is useful for a range of other disciplines, careers and hobbies.

For further reading on the subject:

John Naughton at The Guardian

Douglas Rushkoff - Teach Kids Code

Next Gen Report by Ian Livingstone and Alex Hope

Our team

We're often recruiting new and exciting roles so check back often.

Meet the team Jobs

Hacking the future

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